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Halloween Ghost Stories

Posted by admin On June - 12 - 2011ADD COMMENTS

 

Ghost Stories

 

There isn’t a more appropriate time of year for sharing ghost stories than Halloween. Swapping ghastly tales of freight at slumber parties, around a bonfire or at a Halloween costume party helps get in the spirit of holiday. Whether made up on the spot or handed down through the generations, spooky stories are perfect for all ages around and on Halloween.

 

I’m Not Making This Up, I Swear

 

From all points around the globe, ghost stories emerge. Just like watching a horror movie that claims to be true, the most terrifying haunted tales are the ones that are supposed to be based on real events. This isn’t that far a stretch since all one has to do is turn on the television and pick from one of several shows where people are hunting down “actual” ghosts in haunted places.

 

Just even within the United States there are plenty of areas that boast a spirit world claim to fame of being the most haunted area, town, city or community. From these paranormal hot spots plenty of ghost stories emerge. So much in fact that many places now offer ghost walks where tourists or locals can take a guided stroll and hear some of the accounts of the ghostly activity.

 

There are countless books of ghost stories or hauntings specific to different regions. Pick a city, town or state and do a search for that location’s hauntings to have more home based ghost stories for Halloween time. New Hope, Pennsylvania, for example, has been labeled possibly the most haunted nook of America. Type in “haunted New Hope PA” and there are plenty of ways to find stories or ideas from around the area to create some that could sound true to guests huddled around at a Halloween party.

 

Tales, Folklore, Urban Legends and Myths

 

As previously mentioned, many spooky accounts come from another source or even from personal accounts of paranormal events. Many ghost stories though, are the result of folklore, urban legends, myths or even rumors. In these cases there is rarely ever a way to trace it down to the original storyteller other than someone’s claim that it really did happen to a friend’s sister’s ex-boyfriend.

 

Usually, with this type of tale, everyone has heard some version of it, with the names and minor details changed. A good example of an urban legend of this nature would be the story of “Bloody Mary.” The name often changes and, in fact, a similar idea was explored in the 1992 movie “Candyman” in which the lead female was researching urban legends. Also, the number of times it takes to say the name varies from 3 all the way up to 20, but the basic idea stays the same. After an explanation of how Mary died, and this is where stories can really vary or just be made up, the listening audience and story teller gather by a mirror in a room lit only by a single candle. By chanting the name together a certain number of times, Bloody Mary’s spirit will appear behind the humans in the mirror.

 

Why Ghost Stories Have Become So Popular

 

Ghost stories are obviously beloved because of their ability to raise those hairs on the back of necks, cause goose bumps and generally frighten even the most devoted skeptics. Tales of things that go bump in the night have also been created to give people explanation where no other reasoning seems to be. Humans are quite perplexed by and fascinated by death and what happens to souls on the other side. Haunting theories claim that a spirit may be trapped if there was a murder, suicide or otherwise overly traumatic death. The idea being the spirit has a difficult time moving on to final rest and become trapped in a spot where they either died or a place that was familiar or near and dear to them.

 

Any Halloween get together is sure to be a thriller if chilling tales of the paranormal are on the itinerary. The important part is to keep them age appropriate. It is also a wise idea to not make it the very last thing people leave the party with, so having a more upbeat event following the round of ghost stories is a kind way to enable guests to go home and actually be able to sleep through the night. Whether or not they choose to try summoning up Bloody Mary in front of their own bathroom mirror is their choice.

 

 

Ghost Stories

Posted by admin On May - 22 - 2011ADD COMMENTS

Ghost Stories

The original Celtic holiday of Samhain included spirits of the dead returning to walk among the living.  Ghost stories have been a part of Halloween since the beginning.

Halloween ghost stories can be told around a bonfire, or in a darkened living room.  It doesn’t matter where they are told, as long as the atmosphere is spooky and the stories are scary.

The most famous American ghost story told on Halloween is probably The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving.  The ghost in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is the terrifying Headless Horseman.  The Headless Horseman is the ghost of a German soldier from the Revolutionary War who had his head blown off by a cannonball.  The Headless Horseman is always seen riding around the isolated glen of Sleepy Hollow at midnight, looking for his missing head, and in the story, he might – or might not – have replaced his missing head with the head of Ichabod Crane and left a Jack O’Lantern behind in its place.

Another classic ghost story is The Monkey’s Paw by W.W. Jacobs.  Mr. and Mrs. White and their son Herbert inherit a monkey’s paw from India, which is said to grant three wishes.  Mrs. White wishes for money, and within a few days, her son Herbert dies in an accident at work and she receives the money.  Overcome with grief, Mrs. Herbert wishes for her son to come back from the grave, although her husband thinks it’s a bad idea.

Soon, someone is knocking at their door.  Knock.  Knock.  Knock. Mr. White identified his son’s body, which has been buried for over a week.  He knows that whatever is knocking on the door will look and be so terrifying that he can’t let him in.  At the last minute, Mr. White grabs the monkey’s paw and wishes the gruesome dead Herbert back to the grave.

Some ghosts are in every culture.  The mysterious “Girl in White” appears in American ghost tales as a barefoot hitchhiking girl.  Whoever stops to pick her up on a lonely country road hears a sad tale of how she was abandoned on her wedding night, and just wants to get home.  But by the time the driver reaches the place the girl calls home, he finds an abandoned house, and when he turns to ask if it’s the right place, the girl has vanished.  In Mexico, the “Girl in White” is a beautiful girl named Consuela who dances with an eager young man at a dance.  The young man rushes to tell his friends about the beautiful girl he has danced with, and they tell him that he was dancing alone.  When he returns to Consuela, she vanishes into mist and he realizes that he has been dancing with a ghost.

Edgar Allan Poe’s famous story The Tell-Tale Heart is always scary, especially to those who hear it for the first time.  A poor young man moves in with an older man, who is very kind and generous, but whose appearance has been ruined by illness.  The young man begins to fear and hate the old man’s ugly “vulture” eye.  Every night for eight nights, the young man creeps in the old man’s bedroom with thoughts of murder, in order to get rid of the old man’s ugly, scary eye.  Each time, he is stopped because the old man’s horrible eye is closed.  On the eighth night, a beam of moonlight falls on the old man’s face, and the eye is open!

The young man smothers the old man, to silence his cries and his extremely loud beating heart, racing in terror.  The young man buries the old man under the floorboards in the kitchen.

When police come to question the young man, he is pleasant and reasonable at first, answering all of their questions.  As the officers stay, the young man hears a heart beating under the floorboards.  It grows louder and louder until the young man can’t take it any longer and leaps up, confessing to the murder and asking how they can’t hear the old man’s heart beating as loudly as it is.